Irma's damage to privately insured property in the U.S. will range between $20 billion and $40 billion, with damage in the Caribbean between $5 billion and $15 billion. Meanwhile, the head of the National Flood Insurance Program said Wednesday early estimates show Hurricane Harvey will result in about $11 billion in payouts to insured homeowners, mostly in southeast Texas.

In the wake of hurricanes Irma and Harvey, which left millions facing catastrophic damage in south Florida and southeast Texas, respectively, the need for giving has increased over the past couple of weeks.

David Hall, the divisional planned giving director for the Salvation Army, says it's a part of America's DNA to help their neighbors, which illustrates the good in giving.

“There's a variety of organizations that do incredible work year around and they kind of come to the forefront when we see disasters like this,” he said.

“They are absolutely essential. As much as the government will do and step in, it's leveraged exponentially by the individual private charities that do this and the millions of people whose individual gifts make that extra work possible.”

Nearly 30 years ago, Hall made the decision to devote his life to devote his life to helping others in need through philanthropy. Ever since then, he's worked to help others see the benefit in giving as well. Members of the Pine Bluff Rotary Club gathered at the Pine Bluff Country Club Tuesday to not only learn more about the rewards in assisting others, but also the various ways in which it can be done.

“The business that I'm in, the ministry that I have chosen … is connecting people who care with causes that matter,” Hall said. “My goal is simply to be a catalyst if (I) can.”

The mission of The Salvation Army, which is steeped in Christian faith and belief, is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ all while meeting the needs of people in His name. According to The Salvation Army's website, aid is given “wherever and whenever the need is apparent without distinction, race or creed.” “I work for The Salvation Army and this red shield is a recognizable symbol,” Hall said.

“We have earned a reputation for 150 years of doing really good things and helping a lot of people that have thriving needs and we just say, 'what do you need? We'll help, if we can'.” The confirmed death toll from Hurricane Irma stood at 57 Wednesday morning.

At least 70 have died as a result of Hurricane Harvey. With the electrocution of a utility worker in the British Virgin Islands, at least 38 people were killed across the Caribbean during Irma. In the U.S., 19 deaths were reported in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina from IRma.

Also, police are conducting a criminal investigation into the deaths of six residents of a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida, that lost power in the storm. As in other disasters, Irma poses particular risks to the elderly. There are still 9.5 million without electricity in Florida and 600,000 in Georgia. Officials estimated that it will take at least 10 more days to reconnect everyone.

Additionally, there are still 110,000 people in Florida shelters.

Damage totals are staggering.

Irma's damage to privately insured property in the U.S. will range between $20 billion and $40 billion, with damage in the Caribbean between $5 billion and $15 billion. Meanwhile, the head of the National Flood Insurance Program said Wednesday early estimates show Hurricane Harvey will result in about $11 billion in payouts to insured homeowners, mostly in southeast Texas.

Many charities, including the Salvation Army, have been working overtime to keep up with the demand.

Urged on by dozens of stars who turned out to sing, tell stories and plead for support for hurricane victims in a one-hour televised benefit, organizers said more than $44 million was raised Tuesday and donations are still being accepted. In explaining the power of giving, Hall reminded attendees that being a gift to others helps to strengthen lives, improve the quality of living, and makes the community in which they serve stronger. He urged that having the opportunity to give back to people who are not as fortunate is an example of Christian beliefs.

“It's an opportunity for every Christian to just share the great resources we have,” Hall said. “There's a very special example of giving that comes from Christ himself. The greatest thing we can do is share that joy and the love he has with us.”

Pine Bluff Rotary Club President Carolyn Blakely praised the community of Pine Bluff for being an example of a city who proudly helps their own. “Over the years, we have always been a giving community,” she said. “It seems like it's a handful of people who do it, but it's a whole community. We give what we can and I just think that that we're fortunate, because it means we care about the quality of life for all community citizens.”

Whether giving a monetary donation or volunteerism, Hall urges that both are equally as important. He insists that it's not about what you give, but about the size of your heart when giving.

“It's not about a number or an amount,” Hall said. “Giving, stewardship or a life of philanthropy is an attitude — it's a mindset — it's a heart-set. In my business, I'm looking for people with a heart condition. But, it's a condition that is predisposed to use the abundance God has given them to do helpful, meaningful (and) impactful things for others.”

To help those affected by the recent hurricanes in Southeast Texas and South Florida, visit salvationarmyusa.org Commercial Managing Editor John Worthen and the Associated Press contributed to this report.