The Tau Phi and Tau Sigma chapters of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc., will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the organization at their annual Founders Banquet from 3 to 6 p.m. today at TasteSetter Eatery, 615 S. Main St.

The Tau Phi and Tau Sigma chapters of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc., will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the organization at their annual Founders Banquet from 3 to 6 p.m. today at TasteSetter Eatery, 615 S. Main St.

The keynote speaker will be Paul D. Adams, assistant professor of cellular and molecular biology at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.

The cost of the banquet is $25 and is open to the public.

During the banquet, the chapters will honor their 2011 Omega Man and Citizen of the Year Award recipients.

A Baton Rouge, La., native, Adams attended Louisiana State University, where he received a bachelor of science degree in biochemistry with a minor in organic chemistry. He earned a doctorate degree in biophysical chemistry from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. He was awarded a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship to study in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. Currently, Adams is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, as well as, the Program of Cellular and Molecular Biology at the University of Arkansas. He also holds the position of affiliate investigator in the Biomedical Research Excellence in the University of Arkansas’s Center for Protein Structure and Function. Adams currently holds governmental research advisory appointments with the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Space and Aeronautical Administration (NASA), the Ohio Cancer Research Alliance, and the Louisiana Board of Regents Research Opportunity Program.

In addition to his research, Adams teaches biochemistry and biophysics to undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Arkansas, has edited several biochemistry textbooks, and has authored a lecture series in biochemistry that is used in undergraduate courses in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia and Latin America. His research and service to the University of Arkansas has been recognized with the Robert C. and Sandra Connor Faculty Endowment from the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Science, as well as, the Outstanding Mentor Award from the University of Arkansas Office of Postgraduate Fellowships consecutively from 2008-2011. In April of 2010, he was awarded the inaugural Dr. Nudie E. Williams Award from the J.W. Fulbright College of Arts and Science for his work as a faculty member addressing diversity. Adams is a life member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, where he was initiated in 1989 through the Theta Kappa chapter at Louisiana State University. He is currently active with the Upsilon Chi chapter of Northwest Arkansas and has served as Vice Basileus (2009-2010). Since 2008, he has served as advisor to the Gamma Eta chapter of Omega Psi Phi at the University of Arkansas. Currently, he serves as vice president of the Arkansas Chapters of Omega Psi Phi; the 9th District Council Advisor-Overseer for the State of Arkansas; and as the 9th District Representative to the International UG Chapter Advisors Committee for Omega Psi Phi. He has been featured as an “Omega Man on the Move: Recognizing Brothers Emerging as Leaders Nationally” in the Oracle, the international publication of Omega Psi Phi. At Omega Psi Phi’s Centennial Celebration in Washington D.C., Adams was awarded the Century Award of Excellence during Omega’s Salute to Science and Medicine.

The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. was founded Nov. 17, 1911, by three Howard University students — Edgar A. Love, Oscar J. Cooper, and Frank Coleman — with the aid of their undergraduate advisor, Ernest E. Just. It is the first international fraternal organization to be founded on the campus of a historically black college. The motto of the fraternity is “friendship is essential to the soul.” Manhood, Scholarship, Perseverance, and Uplift are its cardinal principles.