MONTICELLO — "Civil War in Arkansas, 1861-1865," a traveling panel exhibition that examines the experience of Arkansans who lived through the Civil War, will be on display at the University of Arkansas at Monticello's Taylor Library March 13 through April 12.

MONTICELLO — “Civil War in Arkansas, 1861-1865,” a traveling panel exhibition that examines the experience of Arkansans who lived through the Civil War, will be on display at the University of Arkansas at Monticello’s Taylor Library March 13 through April 12.

The exhibit, which is free and open to the public, is being sponsored by the library and by the Alpha Nu Zeta chapter of Phi Alpha Theta national history honor society.

William Shea, professor of history at UAM, will deliver the keynote address at the opening ceremony in the Memorial Classroom Building auditorium March 13 at 7 p.m. A reception will be held in the Taylor Library after Shea’s address. Tours of the exhibit, which will be located on the first floor of the library, will be available during the reception. UAM library hours are Sunday from 2 to 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m.

Shea is a noted Civil War historian and one of the foremost experts on the war in the Trans-Mississippi West in general and Arkansas in particular. His works include Pea Ridge: Civil War Campaign in the West (with Earl Hess, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993); Vicksburg is the Key: The Struggle for the Mississippi (with Terry Winchell, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2003), and Fields of Blood: The Prairie Grove Campaign (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010). His articles and reviews regularly appear in North and South, the Arkansas Historical Quarterly, and other peer reviewed scholarly journals. Shea holds a bachelor of arts degree from Louisiana State University and a Ph.D. from Rice University.

“Civil War Arkansas, 1861-1865,” is jointly sponsored by the Arkansas Humanities Council and the Arkansas Sesquicentennial Commission. The ACWSC created the text and located the images for the exhibit, the Old State House Museum designed and built it, and the Arkansas Humanities Council is in charge of distribution.