Henry W. English, director of the Small Farm Program at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, has received the George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame Award.

Henry W. English, director of the Small Farm Program at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, has received the George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame Award.

The award is given to individuals affiliated with or who have worked with 1890 land-grant institutions over a career and exemplify the public service philosophy and leadership qualities of Carver.

The 2011 award was presented during the 69th Professional Agricultural Workers Conference at Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Ala.

At UAPB, English works with socially disadvantaged farmers and small farmers in Eastern and Southwest Arkansas. He and the Small Farm Program staff provide training and technical assistance to producers in crop and livestock production, financial planning, recordkeeping, marketing, using USDA programs and loan application completion.

Special emphasis is placed on helping socially disadvantaged farmers add alternative enterprises (such as fruits, vegetables, rabbits and goats) to help increase their farm income.

“Throughout his 24-year career as director of the Small Farm Program, Dr. English has submitted more than 40 outreach and research grant proposals to funding agencies,” James O. Garner Jr., dean/director of 1890 research and Extension programs, said. “Through his efforts, more than $8 million in grant funds to assist the 500 plus minority small farmers in Arkansas has been obtained.”

The grants included $900,000 in risk management funds so that women and other undeserved farmers would understand and use crop insurance and other projects.

Approximately $55,000 in grant funds from Monsanto Company was used to establish cotton, soybean and vegetable technology demonstrations to strengthen the relationship between Monsanto and the 1890 institutions.

English is the recipient of many awards including the Outstanding Service Award, Arkansas Chapter of the Black Farmers and Agriculturalist Association; Community Service Awards from Arkansas Land and Farm Development Corp.; the Golden Eagle Award from Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS); and a Service Award from USDA for extraordinary service rendered in providing outreach, training and technical assistance to small and minority farmers in Arkansas.

He serves on the state technical committee for NRCS, the Jefferson County Conservation District and USDA’s Advisory Committee on Beginning Farmers and Ranchers.

His publications have covered such topics as commercial fresh market Southern pea production, commercial okra production, Bermuda grass, soybeans and risk management.