WASHINGTON — The Senate will likely wait until next year to vote on legislation that would have the U.S. Treasury mint a coin commemorating the 225th anniversary of the U.S. Marshals Service.

WASHINGTON — The Senate will likely wait until next year to vote on legislation that would have the U.S. Treasury mint a coin commemorating the 225th anniversary of the U.S. Marshals Service.

Sens. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., and John Boozman, R-Ark., were unable to get unanimous consent last week to bring the bill to a quick vote. Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., objected to speeding the bill to President Barack Obama.

Sales of the coins could provide up to $5 million for the planned U.S. Marshals Museum in Fort Smith.

John Hart, a spokesman for Coburn, said that the senator opposed the bill over concerns that it would cost taxpayers money.

“The bill will be paid for with borrowed money we don’t have,” Hart said on Monday.

Arkansas lawmakers put on a full court press last week to gain passage of the bill. It cleared the House, 412-1. In the Senate, Pryor and Boozman added 38 cosponsors bringing the total in the upper chamber to 68.

“This bill, and the coin it proposes, highlights the commitment and service of our U.S. Marshals throughout history. It is not controversial and it doesn’t cost any money. Moreover, the Fort Smith community, the U.S. Marshals Service, and the 68 senators signed on in support serve as a strong force to overcome Senator Coburn’s objection. Momentum is on our side. We will get this bill through the legislative process,” Pryor said Monday.

Congress has established unique rules for approving commemorative coins. Sponsors must sign on at least two-thirds of their chamber before a floor vote can be cast. Congress is also limited to approving only two commemorative coins in any year, a reflection of the U.S. Mint’s ability to produce such coins.

The Senate adjourned Saturday without taking up the bill. Pryor and Boozman will seek a vote on the bill when they return to session next year.