With one of six counties reporting as of 10:30 Tuesday night, incumbent state Sen. Stephanie Flowers had 4,113 votes or 58.15 percent compared to state Rep. Efrem Elliott's 2,960 or 41.85 percent in the race for the state Senate District 25 seat.

Ed.'s Note: Updated 3 p.m. Wednesday — With all precincts reporting, Flowers brings in the most votes. Results: State Rep. Efrem Elliott
41.53% / State Sen. Stephanie Flowers 58.47%

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With one of six counties reporting as of 10:30 Tuesday night, incumbent state Sen. Stephanie Flowers had 4,113 votes or 58.15 percent compared to state Rep. Efrem Elliott’s 2,960 or 41.85 percent in the race for the state Senate District 25 seat.

Flowers will face Libertarian candidate David Dinwiddie in the Nov. 6 general election.***

“I am encouraged and appreciate the votes that I have received,” Flowers said Tuesday night. “We are still watching and waiting. I think Arkansas and Lincoln have all of their results in and I am very appreciate of the voters in those two counties who voted for me as well as the voters in the other counties who have done the same.”

Flowers touted her legislative accomplishments as a three term state representative and one term as a state senator throughout the campaign as proof of her ability to get things done for her constituents.

“I’ve had legislation passed during my three terms in the House on parental involvement in their children’s education and for inspecting and maintaining public schools,” Flowers said at a May 8 debate with Elliott at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. “In 2007, I successfully sponsored legislation to require that a list of scholarship and grant information is available to high school students.”

In her first term in the senate, Flowers was vice chairman of the Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development Committee and a member of the Legislative Joint Auditing Committee.

Flowers has said that in spite of statements to the contrary made by Elliott, the Arkansas Department of Community Correction has made no determination as to who will be living in the proposed halfway house.

“The Department of Community Corrections and the Board of Corrections have not yet established or created the process for selecting those eligible for parole to be housed at this halfway house,” Flowers said earlier this month.

During the campaign Elliott accused Flowers of lacking leadership ability and of failing to work with the Arkansas Legislative Black Caucus and her colleagues as a whole.

“Usually after someone has served several years in the legislature you can point to something that they have accomplished,” Elliott said of Flowers during a May 8 debate. “My opponent should be able to point to something that she has done that has been beneficial to UAPB.”

Elliott said that his strong opposition to the halfway house stemmed from claims throughout the campaign that the ADCC was planning to house high level sex offenders and other high level offenders at the halfway house and that Flowers supported the presence of the facility and the housing of sex offenders there.

Flowers said that she was not in favor of housing sex offenders at the halfway house because of the high number of sex offenders who already reside in the area and the lack of effective support services for them.

According to the ADCC no final determination has been made on who will be housed at the halfway house.

Elliott most recently has served as Assistant Speaker Pro Tempore in the state legislature.

Elliott formerly served as Chief of Police in Altheimer and worked as director of security for the 6th Division (Juvenile Division) of the 11th Judicial District-West, which includes Jefferson County.

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This article has been corrected from its original version, which incorrectly neglected to include the information that Flowers will face an opponent in November.