Jefferson County Judge Mike Holcomb narrowly missed an outright win in Tuesday's Democratic primary for the state House of Representatives' District 10 post, but will have to face retired University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service executive Dorothy Hall in a June 12 runoff, according to unofficial results.

Ed.'s Note: Updated at 4 p.m. Wednesday with 100 percent of the precincts reporting: Holcomb and Hall set to go to runoff. Results: Mayor Gene Yarbrough 3.77% / Dorothy A. Hall 35.17% / Judge Mike Holcomb 41.06%

•••

Jefferson County Judge Mike Holcomb narrowly missed an outright win in Tuesday’s Democratic primary for the state House of Representatives’ District 10 post, but will have to face retired University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service executive Dorothy Hall in a June 12 runoff, according to unofficial results.

The winner will oppose Republican Charles Roberts in the Nov. 6 general election.

Unofficial returns showed that Holcomb received 1,896 votes to Hall’s 1,235 and Star City Mayor Gene Yarbrough’s 1,046. The respective percentages were 45, 30 and 25. Holcomb garnered about 67 percent of Jefferson County’s votes.

“I was hoping I might do better in Jefferson County, but I had thought we might have a runoff,” said Holcomb. “We’re going to work hard for the next three weeks and see how it turns out.”

Holcomb, a former educator, has been the county judge here since 2006. A vice president of the County Judges Association of Arkansas, he served two terms on the county quorum court before being elected to his current position.

During his current campaign, Holcomb has focused on his accomplishments as a county leader. “I’ve got a proven record on economic development,” he said recently. He said he felt he was “ready to serve at the state level.”

Two of his chief aims are to acquire adequate state funding to support growth within the district, and help lead efforts to keep teachers in the state by giving them needed incentives, including more affordable insurance.

Hall, the Extension Service’s first female associate director, had said her aims included utilizing her work experiences in “developing and conducting” programs designed to boost youth and economic development and and to enhance families. She believed her familiarity with rural Arkansas aided in preparing her for a house seat.

Yarbrough, Star City’s mayor for the past 21 years, said last week that while Hall and Holcomb have “good, solid backgrounds,” he believed he had “the desire to do more.” He rated jobs, education enhancements and health care improvements among the district’s primary needs. He thinks lignite mining “could become the biggest thing ever” in the region.