Pine Bluff police have confirmed that they are conducting an investigation into an officer handing a Taser to an employee of an ambulance company Saturday and telling the employee to use the Taser on another person.

Pine Bluff police have confirmed that they are conducting an investigation into an officer handing a Taser to an employee of an ambulance company Saturday and telling the employee to use the Taser on another person.

Lt. JoAnn Bates, who is in charge of the department’s Office of Professional Standards, said Thursday she could not talk about the investigation, which focuses on the actions of Lt. Edna Butler, who responded to assist another officer on a reported domestic disturbance involving a mother and her son at 4:57 a.m.

According to Butler’s report, the mother said her son, Kendrick Baldwin, 35, was “getting high on the street drug called wet.”

Butler reported that when she arrived, she said she saw a heavyset male with a light complexion, later identified as Baldwin, standing in the doorway of the front porch, and “he appeared to be under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs or something.

“He was holding the door frame as though he could not stand alone,” Butler said in the report. “His eyes were closed at first, and when he opened his eyes, they were very red, his speech was very slurred and he could barely stand on his own.”

Officer Mar’Quill McLemore and Butler reportedly grabbed Baldwin’s arm in an attempt to keep him from falling, and McLemore reported that they tried sitting him in a chair on the front porch but were unsuccessful and eventually laid him down on the porch.

Butler reported that when she and McLemore tried to pick Baldwin up off the porch, “we both saw his hands begin to curve into a fist. He then started punching the wall with his fists.”

According to the report, Baldwin started toward the officers and Butler said “I took out my Taser and handed it to the Paramedics, who was between me and Mr. Baldwin and told him to go ahead and deploy it and hand it right back to me so that I could control it.”

“Mr. Baldwin quickly straightened up and said ‘Ya’ll can stop, that (expletive) hurt,” Butler said in her report.

After Baldwin was handcuffed, Butler said she asked the ambulance attendants to pull the Taser prongs out of Baldwin’s side and lower front right. Baldwin was then transported to Jefferson Regional Medical Center for treatment.

Police department policies say that Tasers should be handled in the same way that firearms should, and used only by officers who have completed Taser training program. The policy makes no mention of allowing civilians to use a Taser.