An estimated 350 people marched across the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff campus Thursday night before encircling the landmark Bell Tower to protest racial injustices in light of the Feb. 26 shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla.

An estimated 350 people marched across the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff campus Thursday night before encircling the landmark Bell Tower to protest racial injustices in light of the Feb. 26 shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla.

Most of the “March for Justice” participants were black, but the crowd included some whites and members of other ethnic groups. Some UAPB faculty and staff members, along with a few off-campus community residents, supported the student-dominated demonstration.

“We feel that what happened to Trayvon Martin is a travesty,” said senior Antoni Lasker of Little Rock. “Justice should be served.

“This sort of injustice against young black men has happened too long,” he said. “It has to stop now.”

“I’m marching for hope and justice for all individuals like Trayvon,” said freshman Andrea Carpenter of Romeoville, Ill. “Racial profiling should not exist within law enforcement today.

“Police and everyone else should identify blacks and whites for who they are and not classify people as criminals because of what they’re wearing,” she added.

“No one should be gunned down,” said senior Valeria Brunson of Pine Bluff. “I’m marching for justice for everyone, since the beginning of racism to now.

“We need to bring injustice to a stop, for everyone and every race,” she said. “I should be able to walk safely in a hoodie or a dress suit. There’s something wrong with the man who killed Trayvon.”

“I’m here to show the unfairness of racial profiling,” said junior Travis Williams of Chicago. “We should be over that by now as a nation.

“We’re all people and that’s the way we need to see each other,” he said. “We all should have a right to healthy, productive lifestyles.”

“Everyone should be treated fairly,” said Odell Wells Jr., a senior from Memphis. “Justice must be served in the Trayvon Martin case, and police should look at everyone the same and treat everyone the same.

“Everyone should be able to prosper and be safe,” he said. “All of our forefathers of all races have fought for that, and we should come together as one.”