Former Pine Bluff Mayor Dutch King and current Assistant Chief of Police Ivan Whitfield will face off June 12 to decide who will be the Democratic Party candidate for Jefferson County Judge.

Former Pine Bluff Mayor Dutch King and current Assistant Chief of Police Ivan Whitfield will face off June 12 to decide who will be the Democratic Party candidate for Jefferson County Judge.

With a majority of the votes counted Tuesday night, unofficial totals indicated Whitfield had a total of 3,024 votes to 3,007 for King. Justice of the Peace Alfred Carroll trailed the two, collecting 1,532 votes.

The winner will face Republican Justice of the Peace Ted Harden in the November General Election. Harden had no opposition in the Republican primary.

King was a member of the Pine Bluff City Council for six years, and was mayor of Pine Bluff for one four-year term.

He graduated from Pine Bluff High School and received a degree in business education from the University of Arkansas at Monticello. He owns Arkansas Marketers, Inc., and Applied Energy.

During his campaign, King has said he would work with business and community leaders in an effort to bring more jobs to Jefferson County and Pine Bluff.

When he announced his intention to run, King said he “helped to bring the new Walmart Supercenter to Pine Bluff and was instrumental in developing the surrounding area and creating new jobs.”

If elected, he said he would focus on “cleaning up the community” and planned to introduce new initiatives to promote more efficiency in government, and improve county services, infrastructure, and waste management among other things.

Whitfield, who led the ticket for much of the night, has been with the Pine Bluff Police Department for 29 years, and has worked in all four divisions.

He graduated from Central High School in Helena-West Helena, and received a degree from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. He is also a graduate of the Southern Police Institute in Kentucky, and the School of Law Enforcement Supervision through the Criminal Justice Institute, a division of the University of Arkansas system.

“I want to build on what other county judges have done in the past,” Whitfield said during the campaign. “One of the big concerns is roads and I want to see that we take care of more roads and keep them up.”

Whitfield also said he would work with the juvenile court system and try to be proactive, developing programs for young people “to keep them out of trouble.”

Like King, Whitfield also said he would work with economic development officials to promote job creation and retaining the jobs which currently exist.