WASHINGTON – A year after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a massive sex discrimination lawsuit against Wal-Mart, House Democrats introduced legislation to allow for such class action lawsuits.

WASHINGTON – A year after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a massive sex discrimination lawsuit against Wal-Mart, House Democrats introduced legislation to allow for such class action lawsuits.

U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., who has championed equal pay legislation for women, introduced a bill Wednesday to restore group action claims filed under the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Speaking on the House floor Thursday, DeLauro called the Supreme Court’s Wal-Mart decision flawed.

“The court erected unwarranted and challenging barriers for groups of private employees to challenge employment discrimination,” she said. “We need to see discrimination in the workplace addressed.”

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court last year said the plaintiffs had not demonstrated that thousands of store managers acted in common to discriminate against women employees of the corporation based in Bentonville, Ark.

The lead plaintiff Betty Dukes, who was hired as a cashier at a California Wal-Mart in 1994, claimed that she and other women were paid less and denied promotions because of her gender.

Wal-Mart denied the claim saying that for years it has had strong policies against discrimination.

DeLauro previously championed the 2009 Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which responded to a 2007 Supreme Court decision that denied an equal-pay lawsuit based on the statute of limitations.

The Supreme Court, in that case, said that time had expired for Ledbetter to file her claim against Goodyear. The clock, they said, began ticking when the discrimination began and not when she discovered it years later.

DeLauro filed her latest bill with 38 Democratic co-sponsors. It is unlikely that the Republican-controlled House will consider it.