LITTLE ROCK — Attorney General Dustin McDaniel said Tuesday he has joined with 21 other attorneys general in sending a letter to Congress asking for a change in a law regarding for-profit colleges.

LITTLE ROCK — Attorney General Dustin McDaniel said Tuesday he has joined with 21 other attorneys general in sending a letter to Congress asking for a change in a law regarding for-profit colleges.

McDaniel said current federal law prohibits for-profit colleges from deriving more than 90 percent of their revenue from federal Department of Education sources, including fully guaranteed student loans, but federal funding from GI Bill and Veterans Assistance educational benefits are not subject to the restriction — a loophole that allows for-profit colleges to operate solely on taxpayer funds.

The attorneys general are asking Congress to close the loophole.

“Some for-profit colleges are actively pursuing our returning veterans and their families and are looking to cash in on the benefits that our veterans truly deserve,” McDaniel said in a news release. “Rather than have a real interest in improving the lives of those who serve our country, their interest is in collecting government money to sustain their proprietary enterprise.”

McDaniel said that of 20 for-profit colleges analyzed in a congressional report last year, total military educational benefits increased from $66.6 million in 2006 to a projected $521.2 million in 2010, a 683 percent increase.

McDaniel spokesman Aaron Sadler said McDaniel’s office has received no complaints about the practice, but the high-pressure recruiting efforts of some for-profit colleges presumably have targeted veterans in Arkansas.

“The evidence of that is clear from the congressional report on the rapid increase in military educational benefits directed to for-profit colleges and the concerns raised at military bases across the country,” Sadler said.