LITTLE ROCK — The state Board of Education turned down three applications for new charter schools Tuesday, a day after rejecting one application and delaying action on another.

LITTLE ROCK — The state Board of Education turned down three applications for new charter schools Tuesday, a day after rejecting one application and delaying action on another.

On the second day of a two-day meeting, the board rejected applications for the proposed Premier High School of Texarkana, The Diploma School of Jonesboro and The Diploma School of West Memphis.

The Texarkana school was proposed by the Dallas-based Responsive Education Solutions, or ResponsiveEd, which operates 30 schools in Texas. The application sought authorization to serve up to 200 students in grades 9-12.

CEO Charles Cook told the board that students in the Texarkana School District need more options. He said the district has a dropout rate of 5.7 percent, compared to the state average of 2.5 percent, and its high school, Arkansas High School, has failed to make adequate yearly progress for seven years in a row.

He told the board the Premier school would target youths who are at risk of dropping out and would offer them individualized instruction.

“They get to a point where it’s just not working for them, and we bring them into an environment where it works,” he said.

The Texarkana district opposed the application. Officials said Arkansas High School is improving test scores and reducing its dropout rate. They also said the district already has an alternative school, Washington 4-A Academy, currently serving 83 at-risk students.

“We just do not see the need for another program to come in and take kids from our district,” said Arkansas High School Principal Robin Stover.

State Rep. Steve Harrelson, D-Texarkana, urged the board to reject the application, saying he was afraid the school would become a way for Texas teachers to work in Arkansas without having to be licensed in Arkansas.

A motion to approve the application received three yes votes and four no votes.

Cook said he expects to try again with another application in a year.

The Diploma School of Jonesboro and The Diploma School of West Memphis were proposed by Osceola Communication, Business and Arts Inc., which does not currently operate any schools. Each school would have served up to 300 students in grades 11 and 12.

The group’s president, Sally Wilson, told the board that Arkansas and the nation are facing a dropout crisis. She cited an Education Week report estimating that 1.2 million students in the Class of 2011 failed to graduate nationwide, including 11,405 in Arkansas.

“Is there an educational need for The Diploma School? We think so. The reason why is because we target our efforts on those students who have already dropped out of school,” she said.

Wilson formerly was involved with the Osceola Communication Arts and Business School in Osceola. Earlier this year the board revoked that school’s charter, saying it had failed to serve dropouts and instead was drawing students — an overwhelming majority of them white — away from public schools.

The Jonesboro and West Memphis school districts opposed Wilson’s new applications.

Jonesboro Superintendent Kim Wilbanks told the board that the districts in Craighead County jointly operate an alternative school that serves about 180 at-risk students a year. She said the alternative school is a good fit for some students, but if it is not the right place for others, then “we want them back in our public schools.”

West Memphis High School Principal John Collins said he saw nothing the charter school would offer that is not already available in the district, which operates an alternative school in conjunction with the Marion School District.

He also told the board that when the proposed charter school’s sponsors held a public meeting in West Memphis, only seven people showed up, three of whom were educators who opposed the school.

Motions to deny both applications passed with “yes” votes from every member present except Chairman Ben Mays of Clinton, who did not vote.

Wilson said she expected to try again in a year.

On Monday the board rejected a proposal for a bilingual charter school in Little Rock and delayed action until January on a charter school proposed for Marianna.