LITTLE ROCK — The state Ethics Commission voted Friday to dismiss a complaint alleging that a ballot question committee violated state law by failing to make proper disclosure of its expenditures.

LITTLE ROCK — The state Ethics Commission voted Friday to dismiss a complaint alleging that a ballot question committee violated state law by failing to make proper disclosure of its expenditures.

The complaint concerned the activities of the Committee for Little Rock’s Future, which was formed to promote two proposed sales tax increases to fund city projects. Voters approved both measures, a 3/8-cent increase and a 5/8-cent increase, on Sept. 13.

Max Brantley, senior editor of the Arkansas Times weekly newspaper, filed the complaint that alleged the committee reported its payments to the Markham Group, a marketing firm it hired to run a campaign in support of the tax proposals, but it did not report any of the Markham Group’s expenditures.

The complaint accused the committee of using “a conduit organization to defeat disclosure.”

Rita Looney, staff attorney for the commission, told the five-member panel that while reporting laws may not specifically state that a ballot question committee is required to report the expenditures of a contractor, she believed the intent of the law is that voters know who is spending money to promote ballot issues.

Kevin Crass, attorney for the committee, argued that ruling against the committee would amount to changing the law. He said that if the commission wanted to make such a change, it should do so by pursuing new legislation.

The panel voted 4-0 to dismiss the complaint without comment, with Chairman Catherine Johnson abstained because of a business connection with Crass. Commission Director Graham Sloan said the panel would issue a written order in the case later.