DALLAS — November 7, 1932 – September 17, 2012. Born in Pine Bluff, Ark. to George Burton and Eunice Crossett Laminack, George graduated from Watson Chapel High School in Pine Bluff, and then worked as an electrician while serving in the National Guard. His unit was called up during the Korean War and he served stateside in the U.S. Army for three years as a Sgt. 1st Class Tank Commander instructing soldiers to operate tanks at bases in Kansas and Wisconsin. With the help of the G.I.

DALLAS — November 7, 1932 – September 17, 2012. Born in Pine Bluff, Ark. to George Burton and Eunice Crossett Laminack, George graduated from Watson Chapel High School in Pine Bluff, and then worked as an electrician while serving in the National Guard. His unit was called up during the Korean War and he served stateside in the U.S. Army for three years as a Sgt. 1st Class Tank Commander instructing soldiers to operate tanks at bases in Kansas and Wisconsin. With the help of the G.I.

Bill, George attended the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville completing his B.S. in Electrical Engineering in three years while holding multiple part-time jobs. He moved to Dallas in 1960 to accept a Field Engineer position with Collins Radio (founding company of the telecom corridor in Richardson). In the early 70s, he made a career change (lasting seven years) becoming Vice President and Plant Manager for a small manufacturing company. George then returned to engineering with Collins/Rockwell International, which later morphed into Alcatel and Alcatel-Lucent. He loved his work and was a brilliant engineer even receiving calls from competitors asking for help problem-solving. A career highlight was working on a Saudi Arabian project, the largest communications contract ever awarded an American company which resulted in George being named Outstanding Engineer and the Saudi government issuing a stamp to commemorate the project’s completion. He retired in December 2008 at age 76 (having held at least one job since the age of 11). A handsome man with quiet charisma, George was adored by his family and was the most unassuming and kind person anyone could hope to know. He loved flying and enjoyed piloting his own little Cessna 140 for several years.

Laminack had what his family called “the knack” (an uncanny ability for fixing anything mechanical or electrical). With a sweet spirit and quick smile, he went out of his way to help others, never wanting anything in return. He changed countless tires for strangers, repaired the appliances and vehicles of neighbors and acquaintances, and would do anything anyone asked of him. George is survived by his loving wife of nearly 50 years (married December 1962), Sharon; their two children, Scott Laminack and Kristin Laminack, both of Dallas; his siblings, Ann Huntley, Loretta Ginnett, and Larry Laminack, all of Pine Bluff; his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Napper of Dallas; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by a host of furry friends (most recently, his devoted cat, Pill) and leaves behind his favorite car (a 1957 Thunderbird), and the last in a long line of worn-out-but-forever-extolled Ford pickup trucks. Special thanks to Bijal Modi, MD; Amy Suttle, RN/BSN; and all the wonderful staff of Texas Oncology at Dallas Presbyterian Hospital, Faith Presbyterian Hospice and September Services. George passed away after a three-year battle with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society North Texas Chapter (972-996-5900) or to Wilshire Baptist Church. Saturday, September 22, 10:00 a.m. interment will be at Grove Hill, and 1:00 p.m. memorial service will be at Wilshire Baptist Church (4316 Abrams Road, Dallas). A reception will follow the service.