With the state recording 18 deaths, with one in Jefferson County, and 1,023 positive COVID-19 cases those numbers often overshadow the number of recoveries in Arkansas. During Wednesday's press conference, Governor Asa Hutchinson reported 1,023 positive COVD-19 cases and 76 hospitalizations.

With the state recording 18 deaths, with one in Jefferson County, and 1,023 positive COVID-19 cases those numbers often overshadow the number of recoveries in Arkansas. During Wednesday’s press conference, Governor Asa Hutchinson reported 1,023 positive COVD-19 cases and 76 hospitalizations.
As of Wednesday, 22,775 recoveries were reported in the state of Arkansas, with political figure, Vivian Flowers of Pine Bluff, on the road to recovery.
In an exclusive interview with the Pine Bluff Commercial, Flowers said she was recovering after being notified Wednesday of last week that she had tested positive for COVID-19.
“I am feeling fine and recovering well,” said Flowers. “I no longer have any symptoms except a little bit of a rasp when I deep breathe but that’s going away.”
Flowers, who resides in Pine Bluff and is serving her third term in the Arkansas House, represents District 17 which includes a portion of Jefferson County.
Flowers said she experienced additional symptoms outside of the ones most referenced to which include a fever, cough and shortness of breath.
Flowers said she didn’t experience shortness of breath and her fever only spiked at night. She did mention a series of coughing and losing her sense of taste and smell along with some nausea.
“I didn’t start getting my smell and taste back until a couple of days ago and that’s what happens. You start getting things back when you come out of it,” said Flowers. “When I felt myself getting sick, I thought about what if I die? What if this takes me out and I am dead in 48 hours like other perfectly healthy relatively young people who have been dying all over the country.”
Flowers admitted her mental state during isolation made her second guess what she did wrong and she expected the worse.
“I knew I had it the Sunday before I got tested on last Tuesday,” said Flowers. “I went through it. I didn’t want to worry anybody but this is a huge mental health component to this that nobody’s really talking about because there is also sort of a stigma.”
Flowers explained the stigma of the African American community, and how media outlets are shifting focus to a race that was once a myth of being invincible to the coronavirus.
“All those myths about black people can’t get it, yes they can,” stated Flowers. “Early on the American Public Health Association warned that African Americans would die and would have a higher death rate and possible infection rate in this and we are seeing that play out now.”
In Dr. Nate Smith’s update, he gave the racial breakdown for Arkansas reporting that 4 of the 18 deaths were African Americans. Smith also names diabetes and heart disease as two of the top underlying conditions of COVID-19 patients in Arkansas.
According to the American Heart Association, African Americans are at higher risks of getting heart disease, which risk factors include high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, family history, diabetes, smoking and obesity.
Flowers said she was most worried about her family being exposed, especially her parents who both have underlying health conditions.
Flowers, who mother has diabetes and father who has congestive heart failure who is a health professional to kids, said she started to feel guilty, worried she had exposed her family to the deadly virus.
“You know you don’t want to expose people,” said Flowers. “You know you feel guilty and wander did I do something wrong to expose myself and expose other people and all the while people are really not understanding that this thing is airborne, that we were told we didn’t need masks and now they say we need masks.”
Flowers was happy to report to the Pine Bluff Commercial that neither her mom, dad nor brother tested positive for COVID-19.
Flowers was adamant about getting tested even though she says her symptoms had dissipated once she was diagnosed.
“That morning when the testing operation opened up, my fever wasn’t high enough,” said Flowers. “The problem is, you start getting a symptom but you’re not affected by that symptom 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”
Flowers said her symptoms stopped on Tuesday, the same day she got tested. Flowers said she advocated for herself to get tested and had she not, she would have been unknowingly infecting others.
Flowers, who said she kept a 2-day record of her symptoms, said her fever spiked as high as 100.3.
“It wasn’t just about giving me the test and I’m concerned for me, it was about the public,” said Flowers. “It was about the kids that my dad sees in his office. It was about my parents who are 75 and 76.”
Flowers comes out of isolation on Saturday and is encouraging the public to stay in tune with what is happening around the world due to COVID-19.
“This is not a game,” said Flowers. “Stay in and stay safe for yourself and your loved ones.”
CDC advises if you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, you should take steps to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.
According to CDC if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.
Jefferson Regional Medical Center has established a COVID-19 resource line to answer your questions. If you suspect you have COVID-19, the number to call is 870-541-4911.

In an exclusive interview with the Pine Bluff Commercial, Flowers said she was recovering after being notified Wednesday of last week that she had tested positive for COVID-19.

“I am feeling fine and recovering well,” said Flowers. “I no longer have any symptoms except a little bit of a rasp when I deep breathe but that’s going away.”

Flowers, who resides in Pine Bluff and is serving her third term in the Arkansas House, represents District 17 which includes a portion of Jefferson County.

Flowers said she experienced additional symptoms outside of the ones most referenced to which include a fever, cough and shortness of breath.

Flowers said she didn’t experience shortness of breath and her fever only spiked at night. She did mention a series of coughing and losing her sense of taste and smell along with some nausea.

“I didn’t start getting my smell and taste back until a couple of days ago and that’s what happens. You start getting things back when you come out of it,” said Flowers. “When I felt myself getting sick, I thought about what if I die? What if this takes me out and I am dead in 48 hours like other perfectly healthy relatively young people who have been dying all over the country.”

Flowers admitted her mental state during isolation made her second guess what she did wrong and she expected the worse.

“I knew I had it the Sunday before I got tested on last Tuesday,” said Flowers. “I went through it. I didn’t want to worry anybody but this is a huge mental health component to this that nobody’s really talking about because there is also sort of a stigma.”

Flowers explained the stigma of the African American community, and how media outlets are shifting focus to a race that was once a myth of being invincible to the coronavirus.

“All those myths about black people can’t get it, yes they can,” stated Flowers. “Early on the American Public Health Association warned that African Americans would die and would have a higher death rate and possible infection rate in this and we are seeing that play out now.”

In Dr. Nate Smith’s update, he gave the racial breakdown for Arkansas reporting that 4 of the 18 deaths were African Americans. Smith also names diabetes and heart disease as two of the top underlying conditions of COVID-19 patients in Arkansas.

According to the American Heart Association, African Americans are at higher risks of getting heart disease, which risk factors include high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, family history, diabetes, smoking and obesity.

Flowers said she was most worried about her family being exposed, especially her parents who both have underlying health conditions.

Flowers, who mother has diabetes and father who has congestive heart failure who is a health professional to kids, said she started to feel guilty, worried she had exposed her family to the deadly virus.

“You know you don’t want to expose people,” said Flowers. “You know you feel guilty and wander did I do something wrong to expose myself and expose other people and all the while people are really not understanding that this thing is airborne, that we were told we didn’t need masks and now they say we need masks.”

Flowers was happy to report to the Pine Bluff Commercial that neither her mom, dad nor brother tested positive for COVID-19.

Flowers was adamant about getting tested even though she says her symptoms had dissipated once she was diagnosed.

“That morning when the testing operation opened up, my fever wasn’t high enough,” said Flowers. “The problem is, you start getting a symptom but you’re not affected by that symptom 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

Flowers said her symptoms stopped on Tuesday, the same day she got tested. Flowers said she advocated for herself to get tested and had she not, she would have been unknowingly infecting others.

Flowers, who said she kept a 2-day record of her symptoms, said her fever spiked as high as 100.3.

“It wasn’t just about giving me the test and I’m concerned for me, it was about the public,” said Flowers. “It was about the kids that my dad sees in his office. It was about my parents who are 75 and 76.”

Flowers comes out of isolation on Saturday and is encouraging the public to stay in tune with what is happening around the world due to COVID-19.

“This is not a game,” said Flowers. “Stay in and stay safe for yourself and your loved ones.”

CDC advises if you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, you should take steps to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

According to CDC if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Jefferson Regional Medical Center has established a COVID-19 resource line to answer your questions. If you suspect you have COVID-19, the number to call is 870-541-4911.