Strong winds due to severe weather blew a tree onto a home Sunday night leaving a 63-year-old man dead. The damaging winds toppled power lines, left tree limbs scattered across roads and residents without electricity Monday morning.

Strong winds due to severe weather blew a tree onto a home Sunday night leaving a 63-year-old man dead. The damaging winds toppled power lines, left tree limbs scattered across roads and residents without electricity Monday morning.
“The tree fell on the bedroom of the gentlemen who was sleeping,” said Jefferson County Office of Emergency Management director Karen Blevins.
According to Jefferson County deputy coroner April Davis, Clayton Resor died as a result of blunt force trauma multiple times. Resor lived in the 2700 block of Highway 365 in White Hall. It happened to be the same place Gladys Clark and her family lived for more than 30 years.
“I just have a lot of fond memories here,” said Clark as tears streamed down her face. “I lived here until I got married. I graduated from White Hall High School in 1953 and I got married in 1955.”
Clark says her mother lived in the home until she moved to a nursing home in 1980. The sale of the house allowed Clark to put her mother in the facility. Her grandson alerted her to the news of her childhood home destroyed overnight.
“There were bricks around the tree and I used to sit out there and read books all the time,” she said. “It’s just shocking to see and I can’t even see any remains of my father’s garage. He was a mechanic.”
Mark Jelks, Resor’s neighbor and owner of the property, said he woke up to see trees uprooted around his 200-acre lot.
“It’s not the first time we’ve had damage, but this is the worst,” said Jelks. “We have about 100 trees down.”
Jelks recalls his brother-in-law first noticed the down tree on the home and called 911. He stated multiple agencies responded to the scene and left around 1 a.m.
“They did a great job,” said Jelks describing first-responders. “They were really respectful of his body with getting him out of the home.”  
Just after 2 p.m. on Monday, 113, 576 customers remained without power based on data provided by Entergy Arkansas’ outage map. Nearly 23, 000 residents in Jefferson County accounted for the total outages. Laura Landreaux, president and CEO of Entergy Arkansas, called Sunday’s storms across the state a “significant storm event.”
“Early assessments for some areas reveal damage comparable to the back-to-back ice storms in December of 2000,” Landreaux said. “We fully understand the hardship that being without electricity will be for our customers who lost power especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have a well-practiced plan for recovering from events like this and execution of that plan began several days ago as we monitored the threatening weather forecasts and began positioning resources to respond after the storm passed.”
Reports received by the Arkansas Division of Emergency Management from local jurisdictions in Bradley, Calhoun, Clark, Drew, Grant, Franklin, Hempstead, Jefferson, Lincoln, Logan, Ouachita and Saline counties ranged from structure damage to loss of water. Blevins mentioned early estimates indicated her office received at least 100 damage reports across Jefferson County. But, she was still combing through reports Monday morning.
“It’s really everywhere,” said Blevins of the damage. “I’m actually trying to sit down and map it all right now. But, I just have pages and pages of reports of trees down and trees on houses.”
By 9:30 p.m. on Sunday, the National Weather Service in Little Rock stated the severe weather threat was over for Arkansas with the exception of far eastern Arkansas.
“I’ve never seen our 911 center any busier than it was last night with all of our lines lit up,” Blevins said.