Sharpton takes on Trump for 'lowlifes' tweet


WASHINGTON — Protesters have toppled the only statue of a Confederate general in the nation's capital and set it on fire.


It comes on Juneteenth, the day marking the end of slavery in the United States, amid continuing anti-racism demonstrations following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.


Cheering demonstrators jumped up and down as the 11-foot (3.4-meter) statue of Albert Pike — wrapped with chains — wobbled on its high granite pedestal before falling backward, landing in a pile of dust. Protesters then set a bonfire and stood around it in a circle as the statue burned, chanting, "No justice, no peace!" and "No racist police!"


Eyewitness accounts and videos posted on social media indicated that police were on the scene, but didn't intervene.


President Donald Trump quickly tweeted about the toppling, calling out D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and writing: "The DC police are not doing their job as they watched a statue be ripped down and burn." After the statue fell, most protesters returned peacefully to Lafayette Park near the White House.


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TULSA, Okla. — Speaking before several hundred people gathered at the site of the white-on-Black rampage 99 years ago, the Rev. Al Sharpton took on President Donald Trump directly.


He referred to Trump's tweet Friday morning of a warning about any "lowlifes" showing up against his rally Saturday.


"It's lowlifes that shoot unarmed people, Mr. President," Sharpton said. "You couldn't be talking about us, because we fought for the country when it wouldn't fight for us."


He challenged Trump's lasting campaign slogan. "Make America great again — give me the date that America was great for everybody," Sharpton said.


"Greatness is when Blacks and whites and Latinos and Asians and original Americans take the streets all over this country and march against your tear gas" and threats to call out the military to squelch protests, Sharpton said. "That's when you make America great.


"Look over here in Greenwood tonight. This is what is great tonight," Sharpton said.