During the three-month period ending in June, Jefferson County Recycling shipped more than 132 tons of tire derived fuel to Evergreen Packaging, according to a report submitted to the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.

During the three-month period ending in June, Jefferson County Recycling shipped more than 132 tons of tire derived fuel to Evergreen Packaging, according to a report submitted to the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.


The tire-derived fuel or TDF, is made by grinding up used tires at the county’s recycling center on Gravel Pit Road.


"It’s going real well," Jefferson County Judge Dutch King said. "We have to save some of it for them because they use it every time it rains. It saves them money and it lets us make a little money."


Evergreen uses TDF instead of wood chips in wet weather, as it burns cleaner and hotter.


The three-month report breaks down the number of tires received from not only Jefferson County, but other counties in the Southeast Arkansas Solid Waste District that also ship their tires to Pine Bluff.


For example, in April, the tire recycling center received 170.21 tons of passenger car tires, 125.5 tons of truck tires and 9.06 tons of off-road tires. In May, the breakdown was 156.69 tons of passenger tires and 138.07 tons of truck tires, and in June, 156.81 tons of passenger tires and 119.06 tons of truck tires.


"Wed have to break it down that way for the EPA," said Daniel Marks, the legislative assistant and grants writer for King said. Marks also supervises the recycling efforts for the county.


Also over the three-month period, 63.47 tons of E-Waste, that is, old electronic items like televisions, stereos and computers, were shipped out.


"E-Waste is growing and growing," King said. "Right now, we’re collecting maybe 10 times as much as we did when we started."


At the recycling center on East Harding Avenue Wednesday morning, boxes were piled high with electronic goods waiting to be shipped. Wallace Murray, who works at the center, said that 26 boxes have to be filled before a pick-up is scheduled.


"We’re getting close," he said.


Also according to the report, the county shipped out 1.96 tons of newspaper and cardboard, and Marks said that because the tire shredders require semi-annual maintenance, county workers who had been bailing paper and cardboard were pulled off to help with the maintenance.


"It’s pretty much all hands on deck but it improves the quality of the TDF and it also makes the operation of the machines easier and faster," Marks said.


Still on the drawing board is at least one shredder for the recycling center, and King said ideally, there would be one there and a second mounted on a truck that could go to the other counties in the district.


According to Marks, that may happen before the end of the year.


"I just hate that we’re not going to be around and see recycling continue to grow and grow," said King, who was defeated in his bid for another term and will leave office at the end of the year.