The Budweiser Clydesdales arrived Tuesday at Hestand Stadium, where a small crowd of people were waiting to take pictures and welcome the famous horses to the first of several appearances this week in Jefferson County.

The Budweiser Clydesdales arrived Tuesday at Hestand Stadium, where a small crowd of people were waiting to take pictures and welcome the famous horses to the first of several appearances this week in Jefferson County.


The 10 Clydesdales and necessary equipment traveled here in three 50- foot semis. According to Anheuser-Busch’s website, each semi has cameras mounted in the trailers that are connected to monitors in the cabs that enable the drivers to keep a watchful eye on the Clydesdales during transport. The team stops each night at local stables to allow the Clydesdales to rest. Air-cushioned suspension and thick rubber flooring in the trailers make it easy for the Clydesdales to travel.


The Budweiser Clydesdales travel all across the country during their tours and require many handlers to make sure they are well taken care of.


"It’s a great job if you like to travel and if you love horses," handler Kat Metzger said. "We are traveling about 300 days a year."


The Clydesdales are here for White Hall’s 50th annual Founder’s Day festivities this weekend. Staff at M.K. Distributors Inc. in Pine Bluff requested the Clydesdales come for Founders Day. M.K. Distributors are a distributor for Anheuser-Busch.


"We requested them some months ago," M.K. Distributors President Duke Fakouri said. "We wanted to bring something positive to the community. The Clydesdales are a American icon, and it’s a rarity that you are able to see them. It’s been about 10 years since they were in this area."


The Clydesdales breed originated more than 300 years ago in Clydesdale, Scotland. Clydesdales were developed for farm work and are capable of pulling a one-ton load at five mph, according to www.budweiser.com.


"The Budweiser Clydesdale wagon train originated in 1933 as a gift from the Busch brothers to their father as a celebration of the repeal of prohibition," Metzger said. "They delivered the first case of beer to the White House after prohibition was lifted."


The Budweiser Clydesdales are usually 10 horses pulling a turn-of-the-century beer wagon with a driver and a Dalmatian.


"The Dalmatian was introduced in 1950," Metzger said. "It was originally used to guard the wagon while the driver was away."


The Budweiser Clydesdales have become world-renowned horses and have been used in many Budweiser Super Bowl commercials.


"They are seen as a huge marketing icon for Budweiser now," Metzger said.


The Clydesdales visiting Jefferson County this week are Fire, Charlie, Curly, Tim, Jack, King, Levi, Rock, Sparky and Princeton and the Dalmatian’s name is Clyde.


People can see the Clydesdales during various times before the Founder’s Day Parade:


- From 2-4 p.m. Thursday, the Clydesdales will be available for viewing at White Hall City Park. The price for viewing is a canned food item. M.K. Distributors, along with members of the White Hall Police Officers Association and the White Hall Fire Department, will be collecting donations of non-perishable food items and new toys for Christmas to be distributed to less fortunate families.


- From 5-7 p.m. Thursday, one of the Cydesdales will be available for viewing during the Pine Bluff Regional Chamber of Commerce Fish Fry at Hestand Stadium. For ticket information, contact Nancy McNew at 535-0110.


- From 2-4 p.m. Friday, the Budweiser Clydesdales will be at the Arts and Science Center for Southeast Arkansas in Pine Bluff. The price for viewing will be a canned food item. All the donations will go to Neighbor to Neighbor.


- And at 9 a.m. Saturday, the Budweiser Clydesdales will be the grand marshals in the Founder’s Day Parade. The parade starts on Dollarway Road at Chipmunk Drive and ends at White Hall City Park.