University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff faculty members visited Phillips Community College on Thursday in a bus tour aimed to attract students from other schools.

University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff faculty members visited Phillips Community College on Thursday in a bus tour aimed to attract students from other schools.


UAPB employees visited Phillips Community College campuses in Stuttgart and Helena and the KIPP Delta Elementary Literacy Academy in Helena on Thursday. They highlighted UAPB as offering an array of majors, providing paid internships and being affordable.


UAPB Chancellor Laurence Alexander said that UAPB has added degree programs and contracted with companies to conduct a strategic plan and a master plan. In the meantime, UAPB has seen a decline in students.


UAPB began to educate newly freed slaves when African-Americans had very little access to higher education, Alexander said. Today the land-grant institution prepares students for careers in medicine, technology, business, agriculture, education and many other fields, he said.


"UAPB is diversifying as we speak," Alexander said. "Our graduates are landing high-paying jobs. We are preparing people for careers.


"We are operating under a new vision that will improve every aspect of the university," Alexander said. "I look forward to meeting with every one of you."


The bus tour is part of a coordinated partnership, rather than a one-day offering, he said.


UAPB Career Services Director Shirley Cherry said she helps students on their path to success. UAPB students are placed in internship programs and earn $13 to $27 per hour, she said.


"We tailor our program to make you successful and will assign you a career coach," Cherry said. "We will develop a marketable resume, which is different from having a resume. If you invest in yourself, we will invest in you."


UAPB instructor O.C. Duffy said that most students are placed in internships and co-ops.


"Come with the right attitude," Duffy said. "You will graduate and we guarantee that you will not have to live with your parents."


Phillips Community College Vice Chancellor Susan Luebke said she recommends her students consider UAPB. She welcomes UAPB recruiters to her campus.


"We are here to provide transfer courses so our students can move on and do greater things," Luebke said. "We partner closely with UAPB."


Phillips Community College students introduced themselves by name and discussed their goals.


John Staymos said he is considering transferring to UAPB. He graduated from high school and enrolled at Phillips, because it is an easier transition. Staymos said he is interested in majoring in biology.


"I think a transition from high school to a four-year college would be a lot harder and cost a lot more money," Staymos said. "If I had gone from high school to a four-year college, I would have needed a loan."


Lance Fields listened to the UAPB employees, finding their information helpful. Fields said he would consider UAPB.


Fields said he is interested in a career in the medical profession and considers UAPB an option because of its acceptance of transfer credits.