LITTLE ROCK — State Republican Party Chairman Doyle Webb on Tuesday released payroll records of Democratic attorney general candidate Nate Steel and said they show Steel has been "double-dipping" on both salary and retirement benefits.

LITTLE ROCK — State Republican Party Chairman Doyle Webb on Tuesday released payroll records of Democratic attorney general candidate Nate Steel and said they show Steel has been "double-dipping" on both salary and retirement benefits.


Steel, a state representative from Nashville, is vying with Republican Leslie Rutledge of Little Rock and Libertarian Aaron Cash of Springdale for the attorney general’s seat. Attorney General Dustin McDaniel is prohibited by term limits from seeking a third term.


Webb filed a lawsuit Oct. 14 alleging that Steel is violating state law by serving simultaneously as a state representative and Nashville city attorney. The suit seeks an order requiring Steel to refund pay he has received in violation of Article 5, Section 10 of the state Constitution, which states that no legislator may be appointed or elected to any civil office.


In a news conference Tuesday in Little Rock, Webb produced a copy of a "city attorney employment contract" signed by Steel and Nashville Mayor Billy Ray Jones on Jan. 31, 2012. Steel was first elected to the state House in 2010.


Webb also provided payroll records showing that Steel has received paychecks from the city of Nashville twice a month since February 2012 and that taxes and other deductions were withheld. Steels’ gross pay was $1,093 per paycheck.


Webb said the non-tax deductions were for contributions to the Arkansas Public Employee Retirement System. He said Steel also receives credit toward retirement for his service as a state legislator.


"He’s paying to accumulate retirement in the city of Nashville," Webb said. "He’s accumulating it in the House as well. He is double-dipping."


Webb also called on Steel to release emails he sent from the House and his retirement records and asked him to instruct the Nashville city clerk to release any emails he has sent to her or any other city official. He said the city has claimed there are no such emails, but "I do not believe that."


"We cannot have someone as attorney general of this state who does not recognize the Constitution of this state," Webb said.


Steel was not immediately available for comment Tuesday. On the day the lawsuit was filed, he said, "This lawsuit filed against me and my hometown is frivolous, and I have no doubt it will be dismissed. However, nothing will likely happen until after Election Day, which highlights the fact that this is a political stunt."


The case has been assigned to Pulaski County Circuit Judge Mary McGowan, but Webb has filed a motion asking her to recuse. Webb said he believes McGowan is "prejudiced against the Republican party of Arkansas and conservative issues."


Webb also has filed complaints with the state Ethics Commission alleging that Steel improperly used a Nashville police car and uniformed police officers in a campaign ad and that he failed to file financial disclosures with the city of Nashville related to his position as city attorney. Steel has said the complaints are groundless.


Liberal blogger Matt Campbell has filed an ethics complaint against Steel’s Republican opponent, alleging that she improperly coordinated activities with the Republican Attorneys General Association by appearing in a television ad the group produced. Rutledge has said her participation in the ad was legal because the ad did not expressly ask viewers to vote for her.