The sound of clanging cowbells will reverberate throughout Davis-Wade Stadium on Saturday night, when Mississippi State (7-0, 4-0 in SEC) plays its first home game as college football’s top-ranked team.

The sound of clanging cowbells will reverberate throughout Davis-Wade Stadium on Saturday night, when Mississippi State (7-0, 4-0 in SEC) plays its first home game as college football’s top-ranked team.


Arkansas quarterback Brandon Allen said the Razorbacks realize it’s going to be loud. But he also said Arkansas will be prepared.


"We usually don’t have any issues with noise while we’re on the field," Allen said. "We’re all loud and we all communicate with each other. I really don’t see the cowbells being that big an issue for us."


Arkansas coach Bret Bielema said Monday the Razorbacks planned to pipe in the sound of cowbells during their practice work this week. Arkansas worked with the noise blaring through loud speakers set up in the indoor practice facility Tuesday.


"I don’t like them at all," Arkansas running back Jonathan Williams said. "But we had a session of practice where they played a lot of cowbells, so we’re trying to get used to it."


The noisemakers once were illegal, though Mississippi State fans have long brought them to games. The SEC approved the use of cowbells in 2010 as long as they are not ringing while an opponent is trying to run a play.


Mississippi State has stressed proper cowbell etiquette to fans on several occasions since. It doesn’t always work. Earlier this month, Mississippi State athletic director Scott Stricklin scolded the "25 percent" he said continue to ignore the rules.


"Remember, we are allowed to bring cowbells into Davis Wade Stadium because the other 13 SEC schools voted to allow it," Stricklin wrote in a message that appeared on the Mississippi State athletic department website. "If we continue to have problems following the rules, then they may decide to rescind that privilege. The last thing any of us want is to have to install metal detectors at the gates."


Bielema will get his first taste of Mississippi State’s cowbells on Saturday. But the second-year coach said he doesn’t have a problem with them.


"I am all for crowd noise. I am all for cowbells," Bielema said. "I think it’s unique that they let them play with them there and they don’t let them take them on the road. That is a very unique scenario. We have got to come up with uniqueness here."


Remember when?


Arkansas defensive coordinator Robb Smith played a role in one of the most frustrating performances in Mississippi State’s football history.


Smith was the defensive coordinator at Maine when the Black Bears beat Mississippi State 9-7 at Davis-Wade Stadium in 2004. Maine, which was a Division I-AA (now Football Championship Subdivision) program, was playing a Division I-A (now Football Bowl Subdivision) opponent for the first time since 1991.


"I remember it was a great night for the Maine Black Bears," Smith said earlier this week. "That’s about all I remember."


Mississippi State was in its first season under former coach Sylvester Croom, who was 21-38 during his five-year tenure. Now, coach Dan Mullen is preparing Mississippi State is preparing for its first home game as the No. 1 team in the nation.


"That was a long, long time ago," Smith said. "This is a whole different story."


OL or QB?


Arkansas guard Sebastian Tretola proved he could throw a pass with his 6-yard touchdown to long snapper Alan D’Appollonio last week. But he’s not alone.


Mullen was asked Monday if any of his linemen wanted to attempt a pass. He said left tackle Blaine Clausell was more than capable.


"Clausell has a hose," Mullen said. "He threw the ball 75 yards the other day in practice. He is up there with our two young quarterbacks. The older guys can’t throw it as far as those guys can. If we ever have a really long Hail Mary we might have to put Clausell in at quarterback. He can probably throw it 75-80 yards."


Extra points


• MSU quarterback Dak Prescott was in a walking boot after his team’s win at Kentucky. But Prescott — who has worked his way into Heisman Trophy consideration in leading the Bulldogs to a 7-0 start — said during an ESPN appearance Tuesday it was nothing more than a "fashion" statement. "I’m wearing the walking boot for fashion," Prescott said, according to the Jackson (Miss.) Clarion-Ledger. "Really, nothing there. Nothing serious. Nothing to worry about."


• Jonathan Williams, Alex Collins and Kody Walker helped Arkansas push its rushing touchdown total to 26 by getting in the end zone last Saturday. The total leads the SEC and ranks fifth in the nation. The Razorbacks combined for 26 rushing touchdowns the previous two seasons (14 in 2013, 12 in 2012). Williams and Collins have accounted for 19 of Arkansas’ 26 rushing touchdowns this season.


• Collins has struggled the past few games, rushing for 126 yards against Alabama, Georgia and UAB. But Williams said Collins has looked much better in practice this week and is confident he’ll snap out of his slump Saturday. "(Tuesday) was probably the best I’ve seen him run throughout this whole season," Williams said.